Academic Advising


Get Academic Advising with Computer Science!

In order to ensure you have the best university experience, our faculty and staff provide academic advising for students who are interested or enrolled in Computer Science courses and programs. Students are encouraged to speak with an academic advisor at least once a year to discuss course or program choices, graduation requirements, etc.

Email Your Question

We may be able to answer your questions over an email conversation. Send your questions to our Undergraduate Assistant by emailing advising@cs.usask.ca

Schedule an Appointment

Prefer to have a conversation in person? Schedule an appointment with one of our advisors today. You can schedule an appointment by email.

U of S Advising

All questions concerning admissions should be directed to the Admissions Office at the University of Saskatchewan. The College of Arts & Science also provides academic advising for questions concerning general degree requirements. Find out more about what the College has to offer by visiting their website.

Online Help

Navigate our online advising resources below or browse through our most popular student questions. If you can't find your answer online or have more questions, let us know and we would be happy to help you out.

New First Year Courses

If you’re looking to major in Computer Science, or simply choosing a valuable elective, our new first-year Computer Science courses will provide you with important skills and digital concepts that will apply to your future career.

Online Advising Help


Information from our Degree Programs are intended to inform students and assist with decision-making. If any of the information published by the Department of Computer Science conflicts with that published in the University of Saskatchewan Course and Program Catalogue, then the Course and Program Catalogue shall be considered the correct and official document. Below are some additional online clarifications and advice that may answer some of your questions:

Advising Sheets (new students)

Advising sheets are extremely useful when ensuring you are meeting all of your degree requirements. We advise students to keep their own copy and keep it updated. These advising sheets can also be found on our Degree Programs page, along with additional important information regarding each degree program.  

The following advising sheets are directed for students who will begin their studies in Computer Science at the University of Saskatchewanin 2016/2017. 

DegreeAdvising Sheets
Bioinformatics
Computer Science
Computer Science - Dual Degree for Engineering Students
Interactive Systems Design
Saskatchewan Polytechnic Transfer Students
Advising Sheets (Current Students)

Advising sheets are extremely useful when ensuring you are meeting all of your degree requirements. We advise students to keep their own copy and keep it updated. These advising sheets can also be found on our Degree Programs page, along with additional important information regarding each degree program.  

The following advising sheets are directed for students who have already begun their studies in Computer Science at the University of Saskatchewan: 

DegreeAdvising Sheets
Bioinformatics
Computer Science
Computer Science - Dual Degree for Engineering Students
Interactive Systems Design
Saskatchewan Polytechnic Transfer Students
How to choose your first year computer science courses

This information is intended to provide some guidance in the selection of courses in the form of recommendations about CMPT courses, but should not be seen as describing requirements. Complete program requirements are listed on our Programs page.

In the academic year 2016-2017, the Department of Computer Science introduced three new computer science courses: CMPT 140, CMPT 141, CMPT 145.  These courses are intended for all students in any program.  It’s a single stream of courses, and your level of knowledge determines where you enter the stream.

CMPT 140: Introduction to Creative Computing
  • Has no prerequisites.
  • Is intended for students who do not have Computer Science 30.
  • Designed to be accessible to all students in all Arts&Science programs. 
  • Counts as a Science credit for all Arts&Science programs.
  • Introduces basic concepts of computation, emphasizing graphics, animations, and interactive systems.
  • Students will learn the basic building blocks of software.  Students will be able to write simple Python programs, and will establish literacy in computation.
  • Leads directly to CMPT 141.
CMPT 141: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming
  • Prerequisites: Computer Science 30, or CMPT 140.
  • Is intended for students in all Arts&Science programs. 
  • Counts as a Science credit for all Arts&Science programs.
  • Introduces computer science and programming using the Python language.
  • Students will be able to write programs to solve computational problems that arise in professional and academic settings.
  • Leads directly to CMPT 145 and CMPT 281.
CMPT 145: Principles of Computer Science
  • Prerequisites: CMPT 141.
  • Is intended for students in all Arts&Science programs. 
  • Counts as a Science credit for all Arts&Science programs.
  • Extends CMPT 141 through additional problem solving strategies, and software design strategies.
  • Students will be able to write programs to solve advanced computational problems that arise in science, engineering, and humanities.  
  • Leads directly to CMPT 214 and CMPT 270.

More about our first year courses

Flexibility in choosing a Program

The Department of Computer Science is home to several different degree programs, which can be found on our Degree Programs page.

Computer Science
No matter which degree you wish to pursue under the Computer Science program, the required courses are very similar in the first two years. The main differences in the first two years have to do with the choice of mathematics courses. Students do not have to decide which Computer Science degree they wish to persue in the first two years. 
Bioinformatics
The Bioinformatics programs require most of the same 100- and 200-level CMPT courses as other Computer Science degrees. Specialized BINFO courses start at the 200-level. Again, if you haven't chosen a program, you can select first year courses that can be used for Bioinformatics or Computer Science programs.
Interactive Systems Design
The Interactive Systems Design program includes several of the courses that are required by our other programs, but not all. It is possible to move from this program to one of the others, but it will require you to catch up on one or two courses. It is also possible to move from one of our other programs into the Interactive Systems Design program.

If you are interested in any of the programs in our department, but are not sure which one you'd prefer, you may contact the Department to speak to an advisor. 

Prerequisite Flow Charts

The course prerequisite structure for Computer Science courses is quite complex, and cumbersome presented on a single page. The information is subdivided into a number of pages showing relevant information in a limited manner.

ChartsNotes
100 and 200-level courses
Contains all the 100-level CMPT courses and some of the 200-level courses that are directly relevant. It is intended as a simple view for new students and students in first year to see the relationship between the courses.
200 and 300-level courses
Consisted of the core 200-level courses of our Computer Science and Computing programs. The information is subdivided by the 3 distinct groups 300-level courses in our programs.
300 and 400-level courses All of the 300- and 400-level CMPT courses in our program are shown. This is the most complex diagram of the series. For convenience, the 200-level CMPT prerequisites are also given, by means of the small coloured icons. Courses are grouped roughly into topic areas, but this is to make searching for a particular course a little easier. There are no implied requirements in these groupings.

How to read the diagrams

  • The colours and shapes are intended to help distinguish between year levels, and are consistent across all diagrams.  
  • Prerequisites are indicated by arrows: if course A points to course B, then A is a prerequisite of B. 
  • Sometimes, arrows represent co-requisites, or recommended preparation, and these have different line styles. 
  • If more than one course points to course B, then all of these courses are prerequisites. 
  • If an arrow points to a circle containing the word "or", then any one of the courses pointing to that circle can be used as a prerequisite for the course that the circle points to. 
  • Similarly, a circle containing the word "and" means that all the courses pointing to the circle are prerequisites for the course that the circle points to. This is used occasionally to reduce the number of long arrows.
  • If you are a student of Computer Science, you'll recognize these diagrams as directed graphs. For other visitors to this site, congratulations! you've just learned some Computer Science. Diagrams like these are used as organizational diagrams for software and data. They can be used just as visualizations of complex relationships, or they can be blueprints for the way data is actually organized in software. Without such diagrams, it would be nearly impossible to build complex software applications.

Important Note: The above charts do not contain complete program information. Please consult the University of Saskatchewan Course and Program Catalogue and/or an academic advisor for complete detail on our programs.

Student with previous degrees

If you are from the College of Arts and Science, you can consider a second degree program. Programs in Arts & Science and in other colleges of this University may be combined to enable the student to obtain more than one degree in less time than if the two programs were taken separately.

If you have a previous degree in Computer Science, you should look into a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. from our Graduate Programs. The Department of Computer Science offers thesis-based master's and doctoral programs. In general, the master's program trains graduates who will become senior technical professionals in industry or prepares students for entry into a doctoral program. The doctoral program trains graduates for careers in academic or industrial research.

If you have a degree from another institution or program, please contact an advisor from the College of Arts and Science. 

Saskatchewan Polytechnic (SIAST) Transfer students

Students completing the Computer Systems Technology diploma from Saskatchewan Polytechnic (previously "SIAST") can apply to enter the College of Arts and Science for further study in Computer Science. Admission must be obtained through the College of Arts and Science. This information is for students who have obtained the CST diploma in 2014 or later. Students who are considering this program should speak with an advisor. Under this agreement, students may obtain a B.Sc. 4 year, Honours or Honours (SE) degree, in just over 2 years of study. We call the arrangement "Two+Two," meaning "Two courses before two full years of study."

Completion of the Saskatchewan Polytechnic Computer Technology Program transfers 54cu to the College of Arts & Science as the following courses:

  • 24cu: CMPT 111.3, 115.3, 214.3, 270.3, 350.3, 355.3, 3XX.3 (software engineering area), 3YY.3 (computer networks area)
  • 6cu: CMPT 100.3, 281.3 (not part of the CMPT major)
  • 24cu: unspecified Arts and Science, 15cu at junior level, 9 at senior level

Two+Two Template

A general suggested schedule for Saskatchewan Polytechnic (SIAST) students to complete the BSc Four Year program:

Summer before Year One
Term 2, July and August
CMPT 215.3
CMPT 280.3
Year One
Term 1 Term 2
CMPT 260.3 CMPT 300-level (3cu)
MATH 110.3 MATH 264.3
CMPT 300-level (3cu) CMPT 300-level (3cu)
Social Science (3cu) Social Science (3cu)
Science (3cu) Science (3cu)
Year Two
Term 1 Term 2
STAT 245.3 MATH Sr (3cu)
Humanities Writing (3cu) Humanities Writing (3cu)
General (3cu senior) General (3cu senior)
CMPT 400-level (3cu) CMPT 400-level (3cu)
CMPT 300- or 400- level (3cu) Science (3cu)

Notes:

  • The software engineering honours degree requires another 3cu of CMPT.
  • The regular honours degree requires another 3cu of CMPT and 3cu of Mathematics.
  • In all programs covered under this agreeement, the student must have at least 42cu of senior (200-level or higher) courses from the University of Saskatchewan.  (This is the Residency Requirement)
  • Students must consult with a Computer Science advisor prior to selecting courses.
  • This agreement only applies to students who complete one of the 4 year degrees.  It does not apply to students wishing to obtain a 3 year BSc degree.  Students who entered the program with this agreement, who wish to complete a 3 year program instead, must have their transfer credits reassessed.  Contact Computer Science advising for further information. 

Resources

Older Saskatchewan Polytechnic (SIAST) Transfer Versions

Students who completed the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Computer Systems Technology diploma can apply to enter the College of Arts and Science for further study in Computer Science.  Admission must be obtained through the College of Arts and Science.  

The information on these pages is provided for students who have obtained the CST diploma prior to 2014.  Students who are considering this program should speak with an advisor. (The current agreement dated 2014 can be found among the advising items listed on this page.)

Under this agreement, students may obtain a B.Sc. 4 year, Honours or Honours (SE) degree, in just over 2 years of study.  We call the arrangement "Two+Two," meaning "Two courses before two full years of study."

Completion of the SIAST Computer Technology Program transfers 54 cu to the College of Arts and Science as the following courses:

  • 24cu: CMPT 111.3, 115.3, 214.3, 270.3, 350.3, 355.3, 3XX.3 (software engineering area), 3YY.3 (computer networks area)
  • 3cu: CMPT 100.3 (not part of the CMPT major)
  • 3cu: COMM 104.3 (Statistics)
  • 24cu: unspecified Arts and Science, 15cu at junior level, 9 at senior level

Two+Two Template

A general suggested schedule for SIAST students to complete the BSc Four Year program:

Summer before Year 1

Term 2, July and August
CMPT 215.3
CMPT 280.3

Year 1:

Term 1 Term 2
CMPT 260.3 CMPT 300-level (3cu)
MATH 110.3 MATH 264.3
CMPT 300-level (3cu) CMPT 300-level (3cu)
Social Science (3cu) Social Science (3cu)
Natural Science (3cu) Natural Science (3cu)

Year 2:

Term 1 Term 2
STAT Sr, e.g. COMM 207.3 (3cu) MATH Sr (3cu)
Humanities Writing (3cu) Humanities Writing (3cu)
General (3cu senior) General (3cu senior)
CMPT 400-level (3cu) CMPT 400-level (3cu)
CMPT 300- or 400- level (3cu) Natural Science (3cu)

Notes:

  • The software engineering honours degree requires another 3 cu of CMPT.
  • The regular honours degree requires another 3 cu of CMPT and 3 cu of Mathematics.
  • In all programs covered under this agreeement, the student must have at least 42 cu of senior (200-level or higher) courses from the University of Saskatchewan. (This is the Residency Requirement)
  • Students must consult with a Computer Science advisor prior to selecting courses.
  • This agreement only applies to students who complete one of the 4 year degrees. It does not apply to students wishing to obtain a 3 year B.Sc. degree. Students who entered the program with this agreement, who wish to complete a 3 year program instead, must have their transfer credits reassessed. Contact Computer Science advising for further information. 
College of Arts & Science
All Computer Science students are registered under the College of Arts and Science. Read up on the different programs offered by the College of Arts and Science (including Computer Science), as well as important academic information and policies on their website.